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Family Ski trip Checklist

It’s snow joke: a checklist for your family ski trip

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Let’s not forget the most important element of all: road safety. Cold, snowy conditions throw up unfamiliar challenges for Australian drivers.

Hundreds of motorists are rescued from sticky (or worse) situations every ski season.

The warm clothes are packed, the pets dropped at the neighbours, and you’ve loaded the kids into your Hyundai Tucson amidst the chaos, a tinge of excitement kicks in: you’re heading to the Snowy Mountains for a weekend of fresh air and fresh turns.

But before you leave, let’s not forget the most important element of all: road safety. Cold, snowy conditions throw up unfamiliar challenges for Australian drivers. Hundreds of motorists are rescued from sticky (or worse) situations every ski season.

TO KEEP THE FAMILY SAFE – NOT TO MENTION SANE – ON THIS SKI TRIP, IT PAYS TO REMEMBER THE FOLLOWING:

Tucson Highlander Snow - 003

  • As with any long road trip, have your vehicle thoroughly checked and serviced before you take off. In particular, cold weather affects battery performance, so check yours is working fully.
  • Make sure your engine radiator has adequate anti-freeze – without it, your engine block and radiator can crack, leaving you with a costly bill. Your owner’s manual will give you details regarding anti-freeze or talk to your local dealer.
  • Diesel fuel features paraffin that can solidify in sub-zero temperatures. If you drive a diesel vehicle, use alpine diesel to ensure the system doesn’t freeze once the temperature gets low. Most service stations in the alpine region have this fuel available.
  • It’s handy to bring a plastic scraper for ice forming on windscreens while the car is parked. If you’re going to use water to clear the windscreens, always use cold instead of hot, as the change in temperature can cause the windscreen to crack.
  • You may require snow chains to gain entry into the national park. These can be rented at service stations in the alpine region. Fitted around your wheels, chains provide better traction by gripping the road and preventing skidding. Practice putting them on before you get on the mountain – both to ensure they fit correctly (they should match your wheel diameter), and so it’s a smooth process if the time comes to use them.
  • Even cleared roads have dangers like black ice, particularly in shady areas at dawn and dusk. Because it blends with the road, black ice can catch you by surprise, so be constantly aware. If you find yourself in a skid, don’t panic – let the car slow naturally and drop a gear. Never brake suddenly or turn the wheel wildly.
  • Always park in designated spots. There are usually marshals at the allotted parking areas to direct you to the correct location. After parking, leave your car in park with the handbrake off – if not, it can freeze in position, locking your brakes.
  • Remember that ski gear – skis, boots, poles, etc. – takes up a lot of space in the car. If there’s enough space inside the vehicle this is always the best option, but depending on how much room you have, you may need to invest in roof racks or carriers.
  • Overall, watch your speed, keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front of you, and prevent fatigue by following the stop, revive, survive rule every two hours as your drive to and from the alpine region.
To keep you Hyundai in top shape contact your friendly Hyundai dealer. Click here to find your local dealer.